Monday, August 14, 2017

Voice of Hope Africa, schedule update


Lusaka, Zambia

All frequencies of Voice of Hope Africa were registered in HFCC Database on August 6

All times UTC

0500-0800 on  9680 LUV 100 kW / 000 deg to SoAf English Mon-Fri tx#1, new additional
0500-0800 on 11680#LUV 100 kW / 315 deg to WeAf English Mon-Fri tx#2, new additional
1600-1900 on  4965 LUV 100 kW / 000 deg to SoAf English Mon-Fri tx#1, ex 1630-2200UT
1600-1900 on  6065 LUV 100 kW / 315 deg to WeAf English Mon-Fri tx#2, ex 1630-2200UT
1200-1700 on  9680*LUV 100 kW / 000 deg to SoAf English Sat/Sun tx#1, unchanged time
1200-1700 on 13680^LUV 100 kW / 315 deg to WeAf English Sat/Sun tx#2, unchanged time
1700-1730 on  9680 LUV 100 kW / 000 deg to SoAf English Sunday  tx#1, new additional

^ co-ch same 13680 ISS 500 kW / 090 deg to WeAs Persian R.Japan NHK World  1430-1500
^ co-ch same 13680 KAS 500 kW / 308 deg to WeEu Chinese China Radio Inter  1500-1600
# co-ch same 11680 KNG 050 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean KCBS Pyongyang, QRM TRT 11675
* co-ch same  9680 PAO 100 kW / 352 deg to EaAs Chinese R.Taiwan Int&CNR-1 1200-1400
* co-ch same  9680 NAU 250 kW / 060 deg to EaEu Russ Sat MW Friedensstimme 1600-1630
(DX Mix News 1022/12 Aug 2017)

Morning Chorus: Pyongyang’s 6 am wake up call


Why does an eerie electronic ballad play across North Korea’s capital every morning?


Greg Noone 
It was early in the morning, but Mark Fahey had been awake for hours. A biomedical engineer turned North Korean propaganda expert, he had spent most of the night tinkering with a radio in his room at the Yanggakdo International Hotel, secretly recording the opening moments of Pyongyang FM Pangsong.
While he listened to the station’s typical offering of classical music and propaganda, another microphone and recorder were set up next to an open window to capture the sounds of the city as it roused itself awake. It was August 2011, and the sun hung low on the horizon. Fahey expected to pick up the sound of the dredging work taking place along the Taedong River.
Instead, he heard music.
(NHK News)

Additional story and video: www.nknews.org/2017/07/morning-chorus-pyongyangs-6-am-wake-up-call/?c=1501301908577&utm_content=buffer69ea3&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=bufferstory

Sunday, August 13, 2017

From the Isle of Music and Uncle Bill's Melting Pot schedules, August 13-19



From the Isle of Music, August 13-19
More dance music this week…
This week, our special guest is Fernando Dewar, leader of Septeto Santiaguero, Cuba’s best working Septeto today and a winner of Cubadisco and Latin GRAMMY awards. He will be talking about their new album Raiz, and we will be listening to some of it. Also, some music from Andy Rubal, a nominee in the Popular Dance Music – Newer Artists category in Cubadisco 2017.
Four opportunities to listen on shortwave:
1. For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in all directions with 100Kw, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 KHz, from Kostinbrod, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK)
2. For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 UTC on WBCQ, 7490 KHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EDT in the US)
3 & 4. For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz from Rohrbach, Germany.


Episode 25 of Uncle Bill’s Melting Pot, a musical variety program that features a little bit of everything from around the planet, will air on WBCQ the Planet, 7490 KHz, Thursday, August 17 from 2300-2330 UTC (7:00pm-7:30pm EDT in the Americas). This week we spend some quality time roaming the Balkans with a little surf rock gibberish on the side.  This week’s episode includes a contest.
WBCQ’s signal has frequently been reaching the Americas, East to West, down at least as far as Sao Paolo, Brasil, and well into Central Europe of late.

(William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer/Tilford Productions, LLC)

Saturday, August 12, 2017

All 60's broadcast slated for August 14

A new broadcast is listed on Channel 292's schedule for Monday, August 14. The broadcast is called 'All 60s', and is shown as operating on 6070 kHz from 1200 to 1500 UTC. I have no idea who is behind the station, and I don't recall seeing it on there previously.

For German listeners there is another of the occasional 'Frequenzfieber' broadcasts with Christian this evening (Saturday 12th) at 1900 to 2000 UTC. It was noticeable last Sunday that the 'Paranoia' podcast from 2000 to 2100 was in the clear for the entire hour now that the Vatican no longer comes on and flattens it at 2040 UTC.

Excellent reception of Hitmix Radio on 5955 kHz with their 100kW signal here in north west England this afternoon from 1200 to 1500 UTC, and a lot of familiar voices were noted in various time slots.
73 for now,
(Alan Dale/BDXC)

Drastic cuts from Vatican Radio reported

QSL via Gayle Van Collection)

Effective 01 August 2017
All times UTC
0040-0100 on 11730 SMG 250 kW / 086 deg to SoAs Hindi
0100-0120 on 11730 SMG 250 kW / 086 deg to SoAs Tamil
0120-0140 on 11730 SMG 250 kW / 086 deg to SoAs Malayalam
0210-0230 on  6185 SMG 100 kW / 086 deg to CeAs Armenian
0210-0230 on  7270 SMG 250 kW / 086 deg to CeAs Armenian
0300-0330 on  7360 SMG 250 kW / 151 deg to CEAf English
0330-0345 on  7360 SMG 250 kW / 151 deg to CEAf Swahili Sun
0330-0400 on  7360 SMG 250 kW / 151 deg to CEAf Swahili Mon-Sat
0345-0400 on  7360 SMG 250 kW / 130 deg to EaAf Somali Sun
0400-0430 on  9645 SMG 250 kW / 114 deg to N/ME Arabic
0400-0430 on 11715 SMG 100 kW / 098 deg to N/ME Arabic
0530-0600 on  9660 SMG 250 kW / 234 deg to WeAf Portuguese
0600-0630 on 11625 SMG 250 kW / 210 deg to WeAf French
0600-0630 on 13765 SMG 250 kW / 184 deg to WCAf French
0630-0700 on 11625 SMG 250 kW / 210 deg to WeAf English
0630-0700 on 13765 SMG 250 kW / 184 deg to WCAf English
0645-0705 on  9645 SMG 250 kW / 228 deg to NEAf Arabic Mon-Sat
0645-0705 on 11740 SMG 100 kW / 130 deg to EaAf Arabic Mon-Sat
0945-1030 on 15570 SMG 250 kW / 210 deg to WeAf Angelus Sun
0945-1030 on 17520 SMG 250 kW / 185 deg to CeAf Angelus Sun
0945-1030 on 17590 SMG 250 kW / 112 deg to N/ME Angelus Sun
1200-1220 on 17520 SMG 250 kW / 185 deg to CeAf Italian
1200-1220 on 17590 SMG 100 kW / 112 deg to N/ME Italian
2040-2100 on  6070 SMG 250 kW / 228 deg to NoAf Arabic
2040-2100 on  7275 SMG 250 kW / 146 deg to EaAf Arabic
2040-2100 on  9700 SMG 250 kW / 114 deg to N/ME Arabic

Revised Vatican Radio summer scheduleAll times UTC
Summer A-17 shortwave schedule of Vatican Radio:
0040-0100 on 15470 PHT 250 kW / 283 deg to SoAs Hindi
0100-0120 on 15470 PHT 250 kW / 283 deg to SoAs Tamil
0120-0140 on 15470 PHT 250 kW / 283 deg to SoAs Malayalam
0200-0220 on 15470 PHT 250 kW / 283 deg to SoAs Hindi
0220-0240 on 15470 PHT 250 kW / 283 deg to SoAs Tamil
0240-0300 on 15470 PHT 250 kW / 283 deg to SoAs Malayalam
0400-0430 on 15470 PHT 250 kW / 349 deg to EaAs Chinese
0200-0230 on  7305 GB  250 kW / 168 deg to CeAm Spanish
0400-0415 on  9660 MDC 250 kW / 340 deg to EaAf Amharic
0415-0430 on  9660 MDC 250 kW / 340 deg to EaAf Tigrinya
0430-0500 on  9660 MDC 250 kW / 300 deg to ECAf French
0500-0530 on  9660 MDC 250 kW / 258 deg to SoAf English
0530-0600 on 11625 MDC 250 kW / 270 deg to SoAf Portuguese
0530-0600 on 15595 SMG 250 kW / 107 deg to N/ME Latin Mass Sun
0600-0615 on 15595 SMG 250 kW / 107 deg to N/ME Italian Mon-Sat
0615-0630 on 15595 SMG 250 kW / 107 deg to N/ME French Mon-Sat
0630-0645 on 15595 SMG 250 kW / 107 deg to N/ME English Mon-Sat
0615-0730 on  7250 SMG 250 kW / 054 deg to EaEu Romanian liturgy Sun
0615-0730 on  9645 SMG 100 kW / 054 deg to EaEu Romanian liturgy Sun
0615-0745 on  9850 SMG 250 kW / 055 deg to EaEu Ukrainian liturgy Sun
0615-0745 on 11740 SMG 250 kW / 058 deg to EaEu Ukrainian liturgy Sun
0700-1030 on 15570 SMG 250 kW / 210 deg to NWAf French (Special events)
0700-1030 on 17520 SMG 250 kW / 185 deg to WCAf French (Special events)
0700-1030 on 17770 SMG 250 kW / 170 deg to SoAf Portuguese (Special events)
0700-1030 on 17785 SMG 250 kW / 155 deg to SoAf English (Special events)
0830-0945 on 15595 SMG 250 kW / 049 deg to N/ME Russian liturgy 2nd Sun
0830-0945 on 15595 SMG 250 kW / 049 deg to N/ME Ukrainian liturgy 4th Sun
0830-0945 on 15595 SMG 250 kW / 089 deg to CeAs Armenian liturgy 3rd Sun
0830-0945 on 15595 SMG 250 kW / 107 deg to EaAf Amharic liturgy 1st Sun
0830-0945 on 15595 SMG 250 kW / 121 deg to EaAf Arabic liturgy 5th Sun
0830-0945 on 17590 SMG 250 kW / 072 deg to CeAs Russian liturgy 2nd Sun
0830-0945 on 17590 SMG 250 kW / 072 deg to CeAs Armenian liturgy 3rd Sun
0830-0945 on 17590 SMG 250 kW / 072 deg to CeAs Ukrainian liturgy 4th Sun
0830-0945 on 17590 SMG 250 kW / 098 deg to N/ME Arabic liturgy 5th Sun
0830-0945 on 17590 SMG 250 kW / 130 deg to EaAf Amharic liturgy 1st Sun
1130-1200 on  9610 GB  250 kW / 168 deg to CeAm Spanish
1130-1200 on 15595 SMG 100 kW / 107 deg to N/ME English Fri
1130-1200 on 17590 SMG 100 kW / 112 deg to N/ME English Fri
1230-1300 on 11875 PHT 250 kW / 332 deg to FERu Russian
1230-1300 on 15370 PHT 250 kW / 332 deg to FERu Russian
1230-1300 on  7485 PHT 250 kW / 332 deg to EaAs Chinese Sun-Fri
1230-1300 on  9560 PHT 250 kW / 349 deg to EaAs Chinese Sun-Fri
1230-1300 on 11945 PUG 250 kW / 315 deg to EaAs Chinese Sun-Fri
1300-1315 on  7485 PHT 250 kW / 332 deg to EaAs Chinese Mass Sat
1300-1315 on  9560 PHT 250 kW / 349 det to EaAs Chinese Mass Sat
1300-1315 on 11945 PUG 250 kW / 345 det to EaAs Chinese Mass Sat
1315-1400 on  9560 PHT 250 kW / 270 deg to SEAs Vietnamese
1315-1400 on 11945 PHT 250 kW / 270 deg to SEAs Vietnamese
1430-1450 on  9800 PHT 250 kW / 283 deg to SoAs Hindi
1430-1450 on 11700 PUG 250 kW / 280 deg to SoAs Hindi
1450-1510 on  9800 PHT 250 kW / 283 deg to SoAs Tamil
1450-1510 on 11700 PUG 250 kW / 280 deg to SoAs Tamil
1510-1530 on  9800 PHT 250 kW / 283 deg to SoAs Malayalam
1510-1530 on 11700 PUG 250 kW / 280 deg to SoAs Malayalam
1530-1600 on  9800 PHT 250 kW / 283 deg to SoAs English Sat
1530-1600 on 11700 PUG 250 kW / 280 deg to SoAs English Sat
1530-1600 on 11935 SMG 100 kW / 130 deg to EaAf Arabic
1530-1600 on 15595 SMG 100 kW / 107 deg to N/ME Arabic
1600-1615 on 15595 SMG 250 kW / 107 deg to N/ME French
1615-1630 on 15595 SMG 250 kW / 107 deg to N/ME English
1550-1610 on 11715 SMG 100 kW / 073 deg to CeAs Armenian
1550-1610 on 15370 SMG 100 kW / 089 deg to CeAs Armenian
1610-1640 on 11715 SMG 250 kW / 055 deg to EaEu Russian
1610-1640 on 15370 SMG 100 kW / 049 deg to EaEu Russian
1640-1700 on 11715 SMG 100 kW / 058 deg to EaEu Ukrainian
1640-1700 on 15370 SMG 100 kW / 049 deg to EaEu Ukrainian
1700-1720 on 11715 SMG 100 kW / 043 deg to EaEu Belarussian
1600-1615 on  9660 MDC 250 kW / 300 deg to CeAf Swahili Sat
1600-1615 on 15570 SMG 250 kW / 150 deg to EaAf Swahili Sat
1600-1630 on  9660 MDC 250 kW / 300 deg to CeAf Swahili Sun-Fri
1600-1630 on 15570 SMG 250 kW / 150 deg to EaAf Swahili Sun-Fri
1615-1630 on  9660 MDC 250 kW / 340 deg to EaAf Somali Sat
1615-1630 on 15570 SMG 250 kW / 135 deg to EaAf Somali Sat
1630-1645 on  9660 MDC 250 kW / 340 deg to EaAf Amharic
1630-1645 on 15570 SMG 250 kW / 130 deg to EaAf Amharic
1645-1700 on  9660 MDC 250 kW / 340 deg to EaAf Tigrinya
1645-1700 on 15570 SMG 250 kW / 130 deg to EaAf Tigrinya
1700-1730 on  9660 MDC 250 kW / 300 deg to ECAf French
1700-1730 on 15570 SMG 250 kW / 168 deg to SoAf French
1730-1800 on  9660 MDC 250 kW / 320 deg to ECAf English
1730-1800 on 15570 SMG 250 kW / 175 deg to SoAf English
1800-1830 on  9660 SMG 250 kW / 165 deg to SoAf Portuguese
1800-1830 on 15570 SMG 100 kW / 238 deg to NWAf Portuguese
1840-1900 on  7360 SMG 250 kW / 184 deg to CeAf Rosary Sun
1840-1900 on  9670 SMG 250 kW / 210 deg to WeAf Rosary Sun
1840-1900 on  9850 SMG 100 kW / 114 deg to N/ME Rosary Sun
1900-1930 on  7360 SMG 100 kW / 180 deg to NWAf Spanish Sat
1900-1930 on  9670 SMG 250 kW / 234 deg to CeAf Spanish Sat
2000-2030 on  7360 SMG 250 kW / 180 deg to WCAf English
2000-2030 on  9670 SMG 250 kW / 210 deg to WeAf English
2030-2115 on  7360 SMG 250 kW / 180 deg to WCAf French
2030-2115 on  9670 SMG 250 kW / 210 deg to WeAf French
2200-2230 on  7410 SMG 250 kW / 068 deg to EaAs Chinese
2200-2230 on  9600 PHT 250 kW / 349 deg to EaAs Chinese
2200-2230 on 11900 TIN 250 kW / 305 deg to EaAs Chinese
2315-2400 on  9600 PHT 250 kW / 270 deg to SEAs Vietnamese
2315-2400 on 11900 PHT 250 kW / 270 deg to SEAs Vietnamese
(SWL DXing/Bulgarian DX/12 August 2017)

Friday, August 11, 2017

Atlantic Oldies schedule information

Hi All,

Rick Ainley of Atlantic Oldies 2NG reports via their newsletter that the station will be back on Shortwave this weekend via Channel 292 and WBCQ,  details below.

Alan.
     
Atlantic Oldies 2NG Newsletter Hi,
First let me thank all of you for the kind words and replies recently after the closure of the 2NG streams. I will reply, there are just a lot!

I wanted to quickly tell you that we will be on ShortWave this weekend. It's a three hour block as follows.


  • Hour 1 - All Sixties with Rick Ainley
  • Hour 2 & 3 - Bill Rollins Teatime Pirate Radio Special.

The shows can be heard as follows.

Saturday 12th August
WBCQ 7490kHz (N. America)
1700-2000 EDT (2100-0000 UTC)
Sunday 13th August
Channel 292 6070kHz (Europe)
1100-1400 UTC (1200-1500 BST)
A common question received if it's available online. 2NG will not be streaming however we believe WBCQ has a stream of the 7490kHz service. Check out www.wbcq.com. There is a web radio in the Netherlands which tends to work well with the Channel 292 service. That can be found at http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/
We planned this weekend on SW before the whole royalty thing blew up. It's remembering the 50th anniversary of the Marine Broadcasting Offence Act in 1967 that silenced the ships. All but one.....

If you get a chance, try and listen.

Best Regards, Richard
(BDXC)



Shortwave Radiogram schedule, August 12-27


Hello friends,
Because of summer activities, this email will include previews for the next three Shortwave Radiogram programs.  These three programs will be all in MFSK32, centered on 1500 Hz.

 These same summer activities will cause even more delay in answering your reception reports and other emails. Nevertheless, please continue to write in!

Shortwave Radiogram program 8, 12-13 August 2017

 1:36  Program preview

 2:42  Return of radio for ship navigation*

10:23  Russian surveillance plane flies over Washington*

16:52  Solar Eclipse QSO Party*

23:15  Ship tunnel in Norway*

25:12  Closing announcements
* with image

Shortwave Radiogram program 9, 19-20 August 2017
This program will feature ten photos by Shortwave Radiogram listener and professional photographer Neil Howard. The photos are of Alderney, in the Channel Islands.

Shortwave Radiogram program 10, 26-27 August 2017
This show will include ten photos of United States airlines that no longer exist, with a brief description of each.

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net
And visit http://swradiogram.net
Twitter: @SWRadiogram
Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/567099476753304


Shortwave Radiogram Transmission Schedule

Saturday
1600-1630 UTC
9400 kHz
Space Line, Bulgaria
Sunday
0600-0630 UTC
7730 kHz
WRMI Florida
Sunday
2030-2100 UTC
11580 kHz
WRMI Florida
Sunday
2330-2400 UTC
11580 kHz
WRMI Florida

 The Mighty KBC transmits to Europe Saturdays at 1500-1600 UTC on 9400 kHz (via Bulgaria), with the minute of MFSK at about 1530 UTC (if you are outside of Europe, listen via websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/ ).  And to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 8-10 pm EDT) on 9925 kHz, via Germany. The minute of MFSK is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/


Italian Broadcasting Corporation (IBC)
 For the complete IBC transmission schedule visit  http://ibcradio.webs.com/  Five minutes of MFSK32 is at the end of the 30-minute English-language “Shortwave Panorama,” per the schedule below:

WEDNESDAY  18.55 UTC  6070 KHZ TO EUROPE

                        19.55 UTC  1584 KHZ TO EUROPE

THURSDAY     02.55 UTC  1584 KHZ TO EUROPE

FRIDAY           01.25 UTC  9955 KHZ TO CENTRAL/SOUTH AMERICA

SATURDAY     01.55 UTC 11580 KHZ TO NORTH AMERICA

                        20.25 UTC  1584 KHZ TO SOUTH EUROPE

SUNDAY          00.55 UTC  7730 KHZ TO NORTH AMERICA

                        10.55 UTC  6070 KHZ TO EUROPE

 Thanks for your reports.  I will be reading your emails to the extent possible during August.
Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Shortwave Radiogram




Wednesday, August 09, 2017

EDXC Radio 2017, to air today !

EDXC Radio 2017 on air today Wednesday 9th August 2017 with few short 15 minute tests on 9290 and/or 9270 kHz starting 16:00 UTC and lasting until 23:00 UTC! Direct transmission will be transmit from Finland.

All correct reception  reports came to e-mail addresses spaceshuttleradio@yahoo.com or to radiospaceshuttle@hotmail.com will be verified via Special Printed QSLs for those who will partisipate meeting in Tampere 18-20th August 2017. (QSLs will be left there to infotable and can be picked from there by anyone reported us! QSL-letter will include also more informative material  of EDXC Radio).

More info of the conference can be found from web  http://sdxl.fi/edxc/index.html Please take part and join with!
 
Others not taking part will get their QSL via e-mail!
Best regards,
EDXC Radio 2017
P.O.Box 2702
NL-6049 ZG Herten
The Netherlands             
(Harald Kuhl/HCDX 09 Aug 2017)

Monday, August 07, 2017

From the Isle of Music and Uncle Bill's Melting Pot, August 7-12


From the Isle of Music, August 6-12:
Charanga, Charanga and Changüi......
This week is dedicated to Charanga and Changüi. Our guest is Abilio Betancourt, Director of Orquesta Sublime, a charanga with a lot of swing that is noticed less than it should be outside of Cuba. You'll hear what we mean with some of their recordings. Also: Orquesta Estrellas Cubanas, another excellent charanga, and some seldom-heard Orquesta Reve from the 1960s. Be prepared to dance.
Four opportunities to listen on shortwave:
1. For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in all directions with 100Kw, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 KHz, from Kostinbrod, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK)
2. For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 UTC on WBCQ, 7490 KHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EDT in the US)
3 & 4. For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz from Rohrbach, Germany.


Episode 24 of Uncle Bill’s Melting Pot, a musical variety program that features a little bit of everything from around the planet, will air on WBCQ the Planet, 7490 KHz, Thursday, August 10 from 2300-2330 UTC (7:00pm-7:30pm EDT in the Americas). This week includes a wonderful new Tango recording, some progressive Folk music from Poland and what might be China's answer to Lady Gaga (not sure whether that was the question though) among other things.William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer/Tilford Productions, LLC

Australian Shortwave Callsign VLN

SS Manuka at Dunedin Wharf
The three letter callsign VLN was first applied to a cargo/passenger liner that served in the Trans-Pacific service between North America and the South Pacific.  The ship was the SS Manuka that was launched in Scotland in 1903.

            The Manuka was a twin sister to the Moeraki that sailed under the wireless callsign VLM.  Both the Manuka and the Moeraki served with the Union Steamship Company of New Zealand, they both served as troop carriers during World War 1, they both carried passengers and cargo across the Tasman Sea and the Pacific Ocean, and they were both ultimately broken up.

            The Moeraki (VLM) was sold to Japan and broken up for scrap in 1933; though the Manuka (VLN) was wrecked at Long Point on the east coast of the South Island of New Zealand just after midnight on December 16, 1929.  During the windy and foggy weather, all 203 crew and scantily clad passengers safely transferred to lifeboats in which they remained overnight.  Next day they all disembarked at the nearby beach.

            The name Manuka refers to the Tea Tree in the Maori language of New Zealand, and the wreck site to this day is a popular tourist dive for those who are willing to brave the cold coastal waters.  The callsign VLN was apparently applied to the Manuka as early as 1912 when communication was achieved with the new wireless station MQI on Australia’s Macquarie Island.

            A new callsign appeared on the shortwave dial soon after midyear 1940.  The callsign was VLN, the frequency was 19300 kHz, and the occasion was test transmissions with Japan in preparation for a new telephone service between Australia and Japan.  (Remember, Australia was not at war with Japan until December 8 of the following year 1941.)

            The new shortwave station VLN was first heard in New Zealand in August and September 1940 and it was in reality a new callsign applied to an old communication transmitter located at the AWA Amalgamated Wireless of Australia, center at Pennant Hills near Sydney in New South Wales.  An additional series of test transmissions from VLN began in January of the new year (1941) and the reciprocating station in Japan was the communication station JUR4.

            A total of at least nine different shortwave channels were allocated to transmitter VLN, and each was numbered as a postfix, such as for example VLN2 on  20250 kHz and VLN8 on 10525 kHz.  AWA at its new office building in York Street Sydney issued a few QSLs to verify these transmissions, usually in the form of a short letter.

            Early in the next year 1942, a new AWA made 10 kW shortwave transmitter was installed at Pennant Hills and this unit took over the previously established VLN service, with communication to several different countries including the United States.  Transmitter VLN was often noted with the transfer of radio programming to the United Sates for local broadcast on the mediumwave networks across North America. 

            By this time, Australia Calling was now on the air from AWA Pennant Hills, with the usage of transmitters VLK & VLM and VK2ME, all under the callsign VLQ.  However during the latter part of the year 1942, Australia Calling needed a higher frequency for shortwave transmissions to the United States than was available from the VLQ transmitters, and so the new 10 kW VLN was taken into service temporarily.  (By this time, the  callsign at Pennant Hills for the program relays from Australia Calling had been changed from VLQ to VLI.)

            Beginning on November 5, 1942, VLN3 on 19300 kHz began to relay the programming from Australia Calling-Radio Australia that was beamed to the United States.  At times, VLN8 on 10525 kHz was also noted in the Australia Calling service to North America.

            This series of higher frequency relays beamed to the United States via transmitter VLN ended around midyear 1943.  A few QSL letters from Australia Calling under the VLN callsign were received by international radio monitors living in Australia, New Zealand and the United States.

            In the meantime, OTC the Overseas Telecommunication Commission in Australia, established a new shortwave communication station at Doonside, another suburb of Sydney in Australia.  The transfer of usable equipment from AWA Pennant Hills to OTC Doonside began on October 13, 1955, and on December 3, Pennant Hills was officially closed, though it remained in backup mode until the end of the Olympic Games in Melbourne in early December of the following year (1956).

            A major callsign at Doonside was VLN, and many QSL cards were issued verifying this callsign when it was in use for international shortwave communication.  These OTC QSL cards were initially simpler in design, though as time went by, OTC issued full data QSL cards with at least some of the printed elements in color.  OTC Doonside was closed on January 15, 1998.

            The final usage of the callsign VLN was as a line callsign for a program relay from the Melbourne studios of Radio Australia to the high powered shortwave transmitter base located at Cox Peninsula, across the bay from Darwin in the Northern Territory.  A new program service to Darwin was introduced on September 26, 1993 and the delivery via line and satellite was identified under the line callsign N.  When the Darwin transmitter base was closed at the end of the day on June 30 1997 for the second time, program line N no longer existed.

            During the nearly four year period extending from 1993 - 1997, Radio Australia issued many regular QSL Cards and Form Letters clearly identifying the location as Darwin with 250 kW, and listing the callsign on the QSL as VLN.
(AWR Wavescan/NWS 441)
(photo/http://collections.tepapa.govt.nz/object/1188976)

The Radio Scene on a Small Island with a Large Volcano


The Radio Scene on a Small Island with a Large Volcano!  That’s our opening topic here in Wavescan today.  The small island with a large volcano is Montserrat in the Caribbean, but that’s not where we begin our radio story today.  Instead, let’s begin this radio story in El Salvador in Central America rather than on Montserrat in the Caribbean.

            Early in the year 1967, Deutsche Welle in Cologne Germany, announced that they planned to erect a shortwave relay station in the small Central American country of El Salvador.  This information about a new Deutsche Welle relay station, their first in the Western Hemisphere, was copied and recopied quite widely throughout the international radio world at that time.  Original planning for the El Salvador relay station called for four high powered transmitters: 1 @ 100 kW mediumwave; and on shortwave, 1 @ 150 kW and 2 @ 250 kW.   

            Two years later (1969), and still with no real sign of progress, international news media re-iterated the Deutsche Welle intent to erect a shortwave relay station in El Salvador.  In anticipation of a completed  project, Deutsche Welle went ahead and bought the transmitters for installation in El Salvador.  However, at that stage, the government of El Salvador disallowed the installation of the projected Deutsche Welle relay station in their country.

            According to Jerome Berg of suburban Boston in his outstanding volume, Broadcasting on the Shortwaves 1945 - Today, the shortwave transmitters originally planned for installation in El Salvador were instead diverted and installed in another new Deutsche Welle relay station, Radio Trans Europe in Sines Portugal in 1970. 

            However, at the same time, Deutsche Welle continued looking for a new host country in the Central American-Caribbean region, and two years later again (1972), they announced that they had become a shareholder in Radio Antilles, on the island of Montserrat.  In fact, over a period of time, Germany provided funding into Montserrat to the value of many millions of Deutschmark.

            Back in the times of ancient antiquity, Montserrat, a small island almost in the middle of the chain of small islands that separate the Caribbean from the Atlantic, was inhabited by Amerindians who had migrated from the American mainland and other islandic areas.  At the time when the famous Christopher Columbus discovered Montserrat in 1493, the island was uninhabited he declared, due to local tribal fighting.

            The local citizens on Montserrat describe their island as in the shape of a pear (fruit), perhaps we might say, a crooked pear.  It is eleven miles long, and seven miles wide at its widest point.  It is a quite hilly tropical island, very verdant, with what had been in earlier times a couple of quiescent volcanoes.  We are told that the island is home to 1,241 different species of small animals, and 718 species of beetles.

            Two hundred years after Columbus, a batch of Irish migrants was taken onto Montserrat, and in fact over a period of time, so many Irish migrants settled onto the island that the Irish Gaelic language was at one stage quite dominant in all of its communities.  During the year 1666, which incidentally happened to be the year of the Great Fire in London, the Irish migrant communities on Montserrat invited France to claim the island, but instead, England invaded and captured it. 

            However in 1782, during the still raging American Revolutionary War, the War of Independence, France did actually invade and capture Montserrat.  During the following year though, the island was ceded back again to England by the Treaty of Paris (1783).

            Hurricane Hugo on September 17, 1989 with its sustained wind force at more than 185 mph wrought horrendous damage to the island and this wide spread 90% devastation was compounded half a dozen years later with the onset of almost continuous volcanic activity beginning on July 18, 1995.  So powerful was the total devastation from the explosive eruptions of Mt Soufriere that the large bottom half of the pear shaped island is declared an exclusion zone, for which everybody has to obtain a police permit to enter.  It is claimed that Mt Soufriere has been the subject of scientific study more than any other volcano anywhere else upon planet Earth.

            The small capital city of New Plymouth was so overwhelmed with millions of tons of mud, volcanic ash and lava that the entire city has been abandoned.  At one stage, the town clock on top of its ornamental tower could be seen just above the level of the accumulated and solidified debris.  Some 8,000 citizens fled Montserrat and they were settled on other nearby islands, in England and elsewhere. 

            A new capital city Brades is under construction on the northern half of the island, and a totally new infrastructure is underway.  In 1994 the total population of the entire island was 13,000, but today their population numbers just 5,000.

            The well known European radio entrepreneur Jacques Tremoulet provided two mediumwave transmitters (20 kW and 200 kW) and two shortwave transmitters (15 kW each) for a new radio broadcasting station on Montserrat, Radio Antilles in 1959.  This equipment had been previously in use as a commercial broadcasting station, Radio Africa in Tangier.  These units, together with additional ancilliary equipment were installed in a new transmitter building located close to the Caribbean shore at the southern edge of the island.

            Soon after Deutsche Welle entered the radio scene on Montserrat, it is stated, they installed a 200 kW mediumwave transmitter that had been procured previously for their El Salvador project.  In addition, Deutsche Welle subsequently installed a new 50 kW Continental shortwave from the United States. 

            Thus, Radio Antilles, with its transferred equipment from the old Radio Africa in Tangier and also from the El Salvador project, together with the new 50 kW Continental, formed the electronic equipment that would be used as as a joint relay station on behalf of Deutsche Welle in Cologne Germany and the BBC in London England. 

            More about the Deutsche Welle - BBC relay station on Montserrat Island next time.
(AWR Wavescan/NWS 441)

Artificial Languages on Radio


It is very evident for the international traveler and for the avid shortwave enthusiast, that there is a multitude of different languages still in use around our world to this day.  Several authorities suggest that the current total number of spoken languages upon our planet stands at about 7,000, a few of which have still not yet been reduced into a system of writing. 
 I (Ray Robinson KVOH) remember the 1960 TV series Star Trek and the universal translator devices used by the characters.  These devices enabled two way translation of spoken languages in real time, and they were supposed to operate by using standing brainwave frequencies, and processing the results to create a basis for translation.

If only that were possible!  Well, we leaving science fiction aside.

 The matter of intercommunication between peoples who speak different languages has always been a cause of national and international difficulty, and many have been the attempts to alleviate this problem.  One suggested approach to solve this problem has been the development of an artificial language which could be easily learned with the intent of implementing it as a second language around the world.

 According to internet sources, there have been many hundreds of attempts at developing artificial or constructed languages during the past 500 years, with varying degrees of success.  One of the very earliest attempts at an international artificial language was the use of a different symbol for each separate meaning, somewhat similar to the ideographic symbols used in the Chinese and Japanese languages.  Interestingly, this old and original concept is again under consideration these days for use by computers in translating from one language to another.

 It was in 1879 that a German priest, Johann Martin Schleyer, began to develop an international artificial language, that he called Volapuk.  During the 1880s, three international Volapuk conventions were staged in Germany and France, wherein the usage of this new artificial auxiliary language was promoted. 

 Within ten years, it was claimed that nearly one million people were involved in the Volapuk language movement.  However, this artificial language is virtually extinct these days, due to its complicated grammar and difficult vocabulary.

 Perhaps the most unusual artificial language was named Solresol, which was developed by a French musician, Jean Francois Sudre in 1827.  This language was based upon the Italian musical scale that was made so famous in more recent time by Julie Andrews in the Sound of Music; do re mi fa so la ti do.  In the 200 year old artificial language, the musical notes were strung together in various combinations to form words that conveyed a specific meaning.

Obviously, this strange musical form of artificial language, which was really a code language rather than a spoken language, achieved very little success.  However, nearly one hundred years later, Professor Carlo Spatari in New York City modified the Solresol language and he reintroduced it as Sirela for use in the international radio world.

 The new Sirela radio language was in vogue for only a short period of time immediately prior to the commencement of World War 2.  In the Sirela code language, the single syllable words in the Italian musical scale were strung together to form a compound word that expressed a concept that was understood in the monitoring of international radio signals.

 A few shortwave stations printed QSL cards which contained code terminology in the Sirela language, and there were also some international shortwave stations that gave brief announcements over the air in Sirela terminology.  According to the informative radio historian Jerome Berg in his first very readable volume, On the Short Waves, there were some international radio monitors in the United States who sent their reception reports to foreign radio stations in Sirela terminology.   
 During the intervening years, there have been numerous attempts at creating an artificial  language for various purposes.  In recent time, most notably there has been an emphasis on the usage of the Klingon language, more as a communication novelty rather than for international communication. 

 The Klingon language was invented for the Star Wars series of movie films, and so well has this artificial language developed that some young people actually converse with each other in Klingonese.  In addition, some of the works of the English playwright, William Shakespeare have been translated into the Klingon language, as have parts of the Christian Bible.  According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the Klingon language is the world's most popular fictional language as measured by number of speakers.

Now, as far as an artificial auxiliary international language is concerned, by far the most widely used has been the Esperanto language, together with its various offshoots and descendants.  Some time soon, we will take an indepth look at the Esperanto language, and its use in radio broadcast programming.
(AWR-Wavescan/NWS 440)

Radio Sultanate of Oman, summer schedule update

(Gayle Van Horn QSL Collection)
Radio Sultanate of Oman:
All times UTC
0000-0200 on  9500 THU 100 kW / 315 deg to WeEu Arabic
0200-0300 on  9540 THU 100 kW / 220 deg to EaAf Arabic
0300-0400 on  9540 THU 100 kW / 220 deg to EaAf English
0400-1000 on 13600 THU 100 kW / 220 deg to EaAf Arabic, 9540 English Aug.2
1400-1500 on 15140 THU 100 kW / 315 deg to WeEu Arabic, instead of English
1500-2200 on 15140 THU 100 kW / 315 deg to WeEu English, instead of Arabic
2200-2400 on  9740 THU 100 kW / 315 deg to WeEu Arabic
(DX Mix news 1021/07 Aug 2017)

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins



Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2017 Aug 07 0315 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/weekly.html#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 31 July - 06 August 2017

Solar activity was mostly at very low levels with low levels observed on 01 August due to an isolated C1 flare observed at 01/0747 UTC. Region 2670 (S05, L=119, class/area Cso/160 on 02 Aug)
rotated around the east limb on 02 Aug. This region was the return of old Region 2665 which was responsible for two M-class flares as well as a fast halo CME on the far side of the Sun. However, during its return on the visible disk, the region has been relatively quiet and stable, only managing to produce B-class flares with the exception of the aforementioned C1 flare that occurred as it was
rounding the eastern limb. No Earth-directed coronal mass ejections were observed during the period.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was at moderate levels on 04 Aug and high levels from 31 Jul-03 Aug and again from 05-06 Aug. The largest flux of the period was 8,649 pfu observed at 06/1715 UTC.

Geomagnetic field activity ranged from quiet to active levels over the period. The period began at nominal levels with solar wind speeds near 340 km/s and total field around 4 nT. A solar sector
boundary crossing from a positive sector to a negative sector was observed around midday on 01 Aug along with an increase in total field to near 10 nT and an increase in solar wind speed to near 450
km/s. A general decrease in total field and solar wind speed to nominal levels was observed on 02 Aug. The geomagnetic field responded with quiet conditions on 31 Jul and 02 Aug with an
isolated unsettled period on 01 Aug. At approximately 03/1000 UTC, an increase in total field was observed to 20 nT followed by an increase in solar wind speed to near 750 km/s as a corotating
interaction region preceded an positive polarity coronal hole high speed stream (CH HSS). Phi angle rotated into a mostly positive orientation around 04/0220 UTC and remained positive through the
rest of the period. Solar wind speed began a slow decline late on 05 Aug after having reached a maximum of 794 km/s at 05/1216 UTC. Quiet to active levels were observed on 03 Aug and 05-06 Aug with unsettled to active levels on 04 Aug.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 07 August - 02 September 2017

Solar activity is expected to be at very low levels throughout the forecast period. No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to reach moderate levels on 08, 17, and 31 Aug while high levels are expected on 07, 09-16, 18-30 Aug and from 01-02 Sep due to CH HSS influence. Geomagnetic field activity is expected to be unsettled to active levels from 07-09 Aug, 17-22 Aug, and 30 Aug-02 Sep with G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels likely on 18, 31 Aug and again on 01 Sepdue to recurrent CH HSS activity.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2017 Aug 07 0315 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wwire.html
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2017-08-07
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2017 Aug 07      74           8          3
2017 Aug 08      74          10          4
2017 Aug 09      74           8          3
2017 Aug 10      74           5          2
2017 Aug 11      74           5          2
2017 Aug 12      74           5          2
2017 Aug 13      74           5          2
2017 Aug 14      72           5          2
2017 Aug 15      70           5          2
2017 Aug 16      70           7          3
2017 Aug 17      70          16          4
2017 Aug 18      70          18          5
2017 Aug 19      70          16          4
2017 Aug 20      70          14          4
2017 Aug 21      70          12          3
2017 Aug 22      70          10          3
2017 Aug 23      70           7          3
2017 Aug 24      70           5          2
2017 Aug 25      70           5          2
2017 Aug 26      70           5          2
2017 Aug 27      72           5          2
2017 Aug 28      74           5          2
2017 Aug 29      74           5          2
2017 Aug 30      74          12          4
2017 Aug 31      74          24          5
2017 Sep 01      74          18          5
2017 Sep 02      74          16          4
(NOAA)

Friday, August 04, 2017

The best $ 7.99 You'll Ever Spend on Shortwave



A BIG thanks to Bill Tilford for the review on my new summer edition of International Shortwave Broadcast Guide
Gayle Van Horn 

***** Five Star Rating

This excellent resource is so much more than just a time and frequency guide - the articles cover a multitude of topics including a great overview of web SDRs, some program overviews and some excellent "how to" articles. It costs less than a good supply of batteries and is well worth the investment, especially if you think there is nothing interesting on the air anymore (this guide proves that there still are programs worth following).
Kudos to Gayle and the rest of the team.
Bil Tilford/Tilford Production

Find out more at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B071VMYYMH/

Shortwave Radiogram August 5-6


Hello friends,
Our transmission Saturdays 1600-1630 UTC on 9400 kHz, via Bulgaria, is intended for Europe is but often heard to the east, as far as Japan and New Zealand. To the west, the limit seems to be Iceland, but fragments of reception in North America are beginning to occur. Richard in New Brunswick decoded a few words of text on 22 July. And Bob in Ontario, 160 km northwest of Ottawa, was surprised to decode this image on 15 July, during unattended reception…


Last weekend, there were several instances of successful Olivia 64-2000 decoding in difficult reception conditions, when the MFSK32 was less than 100%. This weekend, our mode for difficult reception will be MFSK16, with most of show in MFSK32. There will be five MFSK32 images, including two that are gray scale, also known as grey scale, i.e. black and white.
Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 7, 5-6 August 2017,  all in MFSK32 except where noted:
 
 1:35  Program preview
 2:48  Old fish species returns to Illinois*
 8:04  Apple accused of bowing to Chinese censors*
13:52  Russia's "ghostly" radio station*
18:02  Millennials discovering TV antennas*
21:51  MFSK16: Tiny "Sprite" satellites
24:47  MFSK32: Image* and closing announcements

* with image

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net

And visit http://swradiogram.net

Twitter: @SWRadiogram

Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/567099476753304

 Shortwave Radiogram Transmission Schedule

Saturday 1600-1630 UTC 9400 kHz Space Line, Bulgaria
Sunday 0600-0630 UTC 7730 kHz WRMI Florida
Sunday 2030-2100 UTC 11580 kHz WRMI Florida
Sunday 2330-2400 UTC 11580 kHz WRMI Florida

The Mighty KBC transmits to Europe Saturdays at 1500-1600 UTC on 9400 kHz (via Bulgaria), with the minute of MFSK at about 1530 UTC (if you are outside of Europe, listen via websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/ ).  And to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 8-10 pm EDT) on 9925 kHz, via Germany. The minute of MFSK is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/. 
Italian Broadcasting Corporation (IBC)  For the complete IBC transmission schedule visit  http://ibcradio.webs.com/  Five minutes of MFSK32 is at the end of the 30-minute English-language “Shortwave Panorama,” per the schedule below:
WEDNESDAY  18.55 UTC  6070 KHZ TO EUROPE
                        19.55 UTC  1584 KHZ TO EUROPE
THURSDAY     02.55 UTC  1584 KHZ TO EUROPE
FRIDAY           01.25 UTC  9955 KHZ TO CENTRAL/SOUTH AMERICA
SATURDAY     01.55 UTC 11580 KHZ TO NORTH AMERICA
                        20.25 UTC  1584 KHZ TO SOUTH EUROPE
SUNDAY          00.55 UTC  7730 KHZ TO NORTH AMERICA
                        10.55 UTC  6070 KHZ TO EUROPE

Thanks for your reports. It was good to hear from Zdnek in the Czech Republic, who decoded (appropriately) the Radio Prague logo during the 1600-1630 UTC transmission on 9400 kHz, 29 July 

I will begin sending replies and QSLs for SWRG program 5 this weekend. 

Kim

Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Shortwave Radiogram